Postcards From the Veg



Vegan Halloween candy

There’s lots of yummy candy out there that doesn’t include animal products. We bought Twizzlers and Skittles (they’re vegan now) to hand out to trick-or-treaters tomorrow.

To avoid being a “stupid vegan jerkface” like in this Gawker article, hand out some of these vegan candies that kids will actually like (I picked some of the best from a longer list by PETA):

  • Airheads taffy
  • Many varieties of Chocolove barsimage
  • Dots
  • Jolly Ranchers (lollipops and hard candy)
  • Laffy Taffy (some varieties)
  • Lemonheads
  • Mike and Ike
  • Now and Later
  • Sour Patch Kids 

Soup at Mountain Mama

The deli at Mountain Mama has a vegan red lentil soup today, for those of you who live in Colorado Springs. The deli usually has a vegan soup of the day, and they’re always delicious!

Vegan wines

I’ve never paid attention to this, since I always thought the thing that made wine not vegetarian was old-school use of blood in red wines, and I knew that is very rare if not unheard of these days, especially in American wines.

But I love wine. Apparently many (or most, according to a website called Vegan Wine Guide) winemakers use some sort of animal product in winemaking. Clarifying, or “fining,” agents commonly used include gelatin, casein, fish oil and other things, meaning not only are they not vegan, they’re not vegetarian either. (http://www.peta.org/about/faq/Is-wine-vegan.aspx)

So here’s a handy list of wines that are/aren’t vegan that I think I’ll be referring to from now on: http://www.barnivore.com/. It also lists beers.

Lunch for my Colorado peeps

If you live in or visit Colorado Springs, Coffee Exchange on South Tejon Street has an excellent vegan wrap called The Monicque, named after my dear friend who works in the salon next door. I had one today, and it’s quite tasty. It has hummus, avocado, green peppers, onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and a hint of mustard.

Coffee Exchange is at 526 S. Tejon St. It’s closed on Sundays.

Curried Lentil Soup. Mmm

I just made this recipe for soup, and it was fairly easy (though the lentils have to cook for about an hour, and the couscous for 10 minutes after that), and SOOO delicious. If I can make it, you can make it, believe me.

Here’s the link to it, over at NutritionMD.org. It’s one of the recipes recommended in the 21-Day Vegan Kickstart thingy.http://www.nutritionmd.org/recipes/view.html?recipe_id=193.

Perhaps it doesn’t look that good in my picture, but it is!

image

Dutch Bros. coffee

I try to stick to black coffee, or coffee with almond milk in it. But when I’m feeling naughty and want a mocha on my way to work, I’ll swing by Dutch Bros. Coffee, which is a national chain.

To make a vegan version of their mocha, which they normally make with chocolate milk, I order a coffee (iced) with “a little bit of mocha syrup in it.” The barista showed me the bottle of mocha syrup so I could check the ingredients, and, while it is mostly sugar and is not healthful, it is vegan.

OR, if you can digest soy better than I can, they have soy milk and can make your mocha with that.

Forks Over Knives; protein

Just watched the documentary “Forks Over Knives.” It’s a convincing and scary look at how the incidence of many cancers, diabetes, obesity, hypertension and heart disease have risen in America along with our increased consumption of animal products. It has totally re-inspired me about the animal-free diet.

It’s hard to live animal-free when surrounded by the opposite thinking in mainstream America, and I have to regularly remotivate myself with books and movies. “Forks Over Knives” is all about the health consequences of eating animal products, not about animal rights. It’s about how in our medicated society, we treat the symptoms instead of the cause. For example, hypertension is a cause of erectile dysfunction, but instead of treating the hypertension with a plant-based, whole-foods diet, we treat the ED with pills.

Some people in the documentary who were interviewed about why meat is important echoed what this very loud woman in a cafe said the other day: Protein. This woman was at Naturally’s Market in Manitou Springs, a cafe that serves lots of vegan/vegetarian foods and also meat. As I waited for my delicious Qrunch (quinoa) burger and my husband waited for his wrap, we couldn’t help but overhear this annoying woman. She was talking to someone at her table, saying “My husband and I are mostly vegetarian, but we give our kids meat because we want them to have the protein.”

Give those kids a bagel with some peanut butter on it. Or a veggie dog with some beans. Or better yet, some dark-green leafy veggies like spinach, kale or broccoli.

PROTEIN IS THE EASIEST THING TO GET AS A VEGETARIAN OR VEGAN. It is such a misconception that animal products are necessary to be healthy. Not only do Americans eat far more protein than they need, but protein is found in plant products, too. According to The Food and Nutrition Board’s Institute of Medicine, the recommended daily intake of protein for the average person is about 0.36 grams per pound that he or she weighs.

Check out Table 2: Protein Content of Selected Vegan Foods at the Vegetarian Resource Group,  to see how easy it is to eat protein.

PS: I LOVED the song at the end of the movie, so I checked out who it was: Radical Face. I downloaded their album “Ghosts,” and it is SO good.

Vegan Chocolate Cake recipe

VEGAN CHOCOLATE CAKE

Yield: 8-10 servings

1 3/4 cup flour
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup flax milk or other plant-based milk (not lite)
1/2 cup canola oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Powdered sugar for garnish
Procedure:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil 9-inch round cake pan.
Into large bowl, sift together flour, cocoa, sugar and baking soda. Stir in flax milk, oil and vanilla. Mix gently just until ingredients are combined and form a thick batter.
Spoon batter into prepared cake pan. Bake 30 minutes, or until cake springs back when touched. Cool on wire rack.
To serve, dust with powdered sugar.
Approximate nutrition data per serving: 353 calories (38 percent from fat), 15.6 g fat (1.7 g saturated, 9.6 g monounsaturated), 0 cholesterol, 4.5 g protein, 53.6 g carbohydrates, 3.4 g fiber, 172 mg sodium.

SOURCE: Wave of Dairy-free Milks Hits Grocers